Some people might argue that qualifications such as editorial reviews and prizes are the way to acknowledge a good writer. I beg to differ. Consider Emily Dickinson who, was once an insignificant poet, is now one of the major American poets. This occurs because we, as a culture, define “best” authors in relation to our historical context. Therefore, one century’s bad artist is the greatest of another, and viceversa. Prizes and recognition serve well for those who purse fame and success within their lifetime, but there are other artists who create for the love of it.

I am one of those poets. Instead of participating in awards, I believe my work has to stand and speak for itself. Although qualifications are the easiest way for a poet to become recognized in his or her lifetime, I have chosen to challenge the status quo. This status quo is an invisible entity that states ‘what is’ the best practice from a series of individual points of view that became social, such as a tight circle of critics, and that then applied their analysis in every context without understanding ‘what truly is’: what truly is best can only be considered in a delicate balance between the social and the individual, being the individual, every individual, not only a specific group that defines ‘what is’. Right now, this balance is difficult to achieve because the status quo impedes it as a ghost of ‘what should be’ posing as ‘what is’ rather than accepting the quest toward ‘what truly is’ from an uncertain and constantly balancing point of view.

That said, I try to be in a balancing journey toward ‘what truly is’ but the truth is an elusive concept. A poet can approach it from many fronts. In contrast from a philosopher, a poet can bend the rules of logic and speak directly into the poetic, that is, the creative aspect within ourselves. It is here, my dear reader, where I dwell. I want to speak directly to you. If I am not able to, I will continue to practice because I know that the more I practice, the closer we will get to that point in history where you and I will be able to coincide.

So, why should you read me? There is no should. There is only a why, and that why is because you want to grow together with me in a creative manner that is true to yourself. I publish in the web because not only I want to share my work with you freely, but I would love to hear from your perspective: teach me and let me teach you. Be my eyes, see the beauty I see, and if you want, let me see through yours.

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